Monday, November 05, 2018

KIM KARDASHIAN DEFENDS DECISION TO RIDE ELEPHANT AFTER CRITICS ACCUSE HER OF ‘ANIMAL CRUELTY’


Kim Kardashian-West has responded to critics who accused her of “animal cruelty” after she was pictured riding an elephant in Sumatra, Indonesia.

The 38-year-old was visiting an elephant sanctuary with her two young children, North and Saint, and has insisted that she “did full research” before arriving.

But photographs of the reality TV star sat astride one of the animals prompted a diatribe on social media, with wildlife campaigners calling her actions “disgusting” and “irresponsible”.

“You should be ashamed of yourself riding those elephants,” wrote one person on Twitter.

“Those elephants should be free and shouldn’t have to drive you and your family around!”

Another added: “Why am I not surprised that in 2018 Kim Kardashian is riding elephants and further promoting animal exploitation tourism.

“Disgusting and irresponsibly cruel. If you knew what pain and torture they’ve been through.”

Downton Abbey actor Peter Egan, who played Hugh MacClare, tweeted the images and accused the mother-of-two of “ignorance and such a lack of care”.

He continued: “Doesn’t she understand the cruelty inflicted on these poor elephants in order for her inane photo shoot?”

Several hours later, the Keeping Up With The Kardashians star responded to Egan, writing: “We visited an elephant sanctuary that has rescued these elephants from Sumatra where they would have otherwise gone extinct.

“It is an organisation that is working to save these beautiful animals. We did full research before going.”

A representative from the animal rights organisation PETA has explained how riding elephants can have adverse effects.

“All over the world, tourist traps offer the chance to climb up on an elephant's back without divulging what these animals endure,” said Rachel Matthews, deputy director at PETA in the US.

“Baby elephants have their spirits broken through an egregiously cruel process in which still-nursing elephants are dragged from their mothers, immobilised, and gouged with bull hooks and nails.

“These horrific, ritualized training sessions often leave elephants severely injured and traumatized, and some do not survive. Riding elephants or visiting camps that force elephants to come into contact with humans directly supports these abuses.”

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Tuesday, October 23, 2018

COVERED IN WOUNDS Horror as cruel elephant keepers STAB helpless beasts through the trunk to control them in front of holiday makers


THESE shocking pictures show elephants allegedly being punctured with sharp objects by cruel handlers forcing them to perform.

The shocking abuse was allegedly uncovered at the Taman Safari in the city of Bogor, West Java, Indonesia.

On later inspection the skin of the elephant can be seen to be badly damaged

A scar can clearly be seen on this elephant

It would seem the animals must suffer in the name of entertainment

Wounds are clearly visible all over their bodies

None of the audience seems in the least bit concerned at what is going on

WAZA has confirmed they are investigating the allegations.

Dr Chris Draper, Head of Animal Welfare and Captivity at Born Free, said: "Born Free has been concerned about the activities at Taman Safari in Bogor, Indonesia, for some time, as a result of numerous complaints from tourists and members of the public visiting the zoo.

"The direct abuse of elephants reported is completely unacceptable and must be investigated by the relevant authorities.

"It is shocking that this zoo is listed as a member of WAZA, which claims to represent ‘leading’, ‘high standard’ zoos across the world, and apparently requires its members to 'ensure that they ‘ensure that all animals in their care are treated with the utmost care and their welfare should be paramount all times'.

"These assurances begin to sound meaningless in light of the reported abuse and exploitation of elephants in shows and rides at one of their members zoo."

One of the beleaguered elephants raises his trunk when he sees the photographer

On the Taman Safari Indonesia (TSI) website, the zoo claims to be a "pioneer leader in conservation and recreational parks".

A statement about the organisation reads: "With its long experience in this field, TSI has obtained both national and international accreditation as the best conservation institute in Indonesia for wildlife management and its supporting infrastructure."

It also states: "Today, Taman Safari Indonesia is determined in its commitment to continue its endeavour to become a conservation, education and recreation park proudly recognised the world over."

Families can be seen happily riding around on the allegedly injured beasts

Aaron, 38, added: "Every day the elephants perform in shows which involve elaborate reconstructions of human and elephant conflict caused by the palm oil industry.

"After a show when we were there, the elephants became boisterous. A handler was seen to punch one on its trunks and pull its tail in order to control it.

"On closer inspection, it appeared the handler was concealing a sharp object in his hand, which caused multiple puncture wounds on the elephant's trunk."

The safari park is now under investigation after the photographs came to light

After checking out the other elephants, Aaron said they also had similar wounds.

He said: "Security saw us documenting what was happening and asked us to put our cameras away.

"The images have not been seen by many people, but I think they will be shocked.

"Elephants are much loved, intelligent and sentient beings that should not be ridden, touched or used in shows.

"They’re not here for our entertainment. And they most definitely should not be controlled using such violent means.

"Elephants have some of the most finely tuned senses in the animal kingdom, so Taman Safari, Bogor, would be a very stressful environment for them with lots of people, small areas, loud music, flashing lights.

"It’s about as unsuitable a habit for elephants that one could imagine."

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Example Title

An excited crowd of tourists cheered on an elephant show in Taman Safari in Bogor, West Java, Indonesia, as the elephants were stabbed in their trunks by their handlers.

This shocking animal abuse was documented by Born Free, a wildlife charity and Aaron Gekoski, a photojournalist. He said the photos of the stab wounds on the elephants’ trunks were inflicted by the trainers as a means to control the animals.

Other abuse taking place by the animal trainers includes pulling the elephants’ tails and punching them in their trunks.

This zoo is a member of the World Associations of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) which mandates its members to treat all animals in their capticity with the utmost care.

Photo journalist Gekoski said: “Every day the elephants perform in shows which involve elaborate reconstructions of human and elephant conflict caused by the palm oil industry. After a show when we were there, the elephants became boisterous. A handler was seen to punch one on its trunks and pull its tail in order to control it.

“On closer inspection, it appeared the handler was concealing a sharp object in his hand, which caused multiple puncture wounds on the elephant’s trunk. After checking out the other elephants, they also had similar wounds. Security saw us documenting what was happening and asked us to put our cameras away.”




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Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Indonesia to Restore Elephant Habitats Amid Declining Population of the Species


Jakarta, GIVnews.com – The Indonesian government is planning to restore elephant habitats in Sumatra and Kalimantan, homes of the endangered species. This move is meant as a respond to the reportedly declining number of elephants on the two big islands.

Currently, elephants in Indonesia are mostly found in Sumatra. It has been reported by Kompas that 1,700 elephants currently live in several areas in Sumatra, including in the northern part of Aceh and Lampung in southern Sumatra. The number is below the 2,700 elephants population that was recorded a decade ago.

Quoting a survey by the Indonesian Elephant Population Forum (FKGI), the Kompas article also mentioned about serious elephants’ extinction across 13 habitat locations in Sumatra. This situation was due to the massive opening of new plantations and the creation of more monoculture forest areas on the island. Illegal poaching had also worsen the situation, according to FKGI.

Many of these elephants reside in national parks. The Seblat Natural Park in Bengkulu currently has about 70 elephants. And the elephant population in the 6,000-hectare park may decline due to the planned opening of new coal mines in the area. The Mount Leuser National Park in Aceh is currently home to about 400 elephants. But, a steam power plant project in the area could seriously threaten the existence of those species. Meanwhile, in the Bukit Tigapuluh Ekosistim Park in Jambi, oil palm, rubber, acacia and eucalyptus plantation projects are dispersing elephant flocks.

Conservationists had in the past years aired their worries about a decreasing number of elephants in Indonesia as no serious efforts had been made to prevent the decline from happening. Reportedly, the number of elephants in Sumatra and Kalimantan had continued to shrink over the past 25 years due to various reasons. They included poisoning, natural death and decreasing conserved forest areas because of the opening of new oil palm estates. But, not much is known about elephants in Kalimantan.

Beside Indonesia, 11 other Asian countries also have elephant population. They include Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. Elephant population is also found in Sub-Saharan Africa.

You may also be interested in this article: A Dangerous Place for Elephants

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Indonesia to Restore Elephant Habitats Amid Declining Population of the Species


Jakarta, GIVnews.com – The Indonesian government is planning to restore elephant habitats in Sumatra and Kalimantan, homes of the endangered species. This move is meant as a respond to the reportedly declining number of elephants on the two big islands.

Currently, elephants in Indonesia are mostly found in Sumatra. It has been reported by Kompas that 1,700 elephants currently live in several areas in Sumatra, including in the northern part of Aceh and Lampung in southern Sumatra. The number is below the 2,700 elephants population that was recorded a decade ago.

Quoting a survey by the Indonesian Elephant Population Forum (FKGI), the Kompas article also mentioned about serious elephants’ extinction across 13 habitat locations in Sumatra. This situation was due to the massive opening of new plantations and the creation of more monoculture forest areas on the island. Illegal poaching had also worsen the situation, according to FKGI.

Many of these elephants reside in national parks. The Seblat Natural Park in Bengkulu currently has about 70 elephants. And the elephant population in the 6,000-hectare park may decline due to the planned opening of new coal mines in the area. The Mount Leuser National Park in Aceh is currently home to about 400 elephants. But, a steam power plant project in the area could seriously threaten the existence of those species. Meanwhile, in the Bukit Tigapuluh Ekosistim Park in Jambi, oil palm, rubber, acacia and eucalyptus plantation projects are dispersing elephant flocks.

Conservationists had in the past years aired their worries about a decreasing number of elephants in Indonesia as no serious efforts had been made to prevent the decline from happening. Reportedly, the number of elephants in Sumatra and Kalimantan had continued to shrink over the past 25 years due to various reasons. They included poisoning, natural death and decreasing conserved forest areas because of the opening of new oil palm estates. But, not much is known about elephants in Kalimantan.

Beside Indonesia, 11 other Asian countries also have elephant population. They include Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. Elephant population is also found in Sub-Saharan Africa.

You may also be interested in this article: A Dangerous Place for Elephants

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Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Elephants take the flag in Indonesia independence ceremony


A trio of rare elephants led an unusual ceremony in the Sumatran jungle Friday, raising Indonesia’s red and white flag to help mark the country’s independence day. Brandishing a flagpole flying the national colours by the trunk, lead elephant Ulu marched outside a conservation office in northern Aceh province as onlookers sung the national anthem. “As we can see here, this is also an education for us, that elephants can live side by side with humans,” Rizal, an elephant trainer at the conservation office, told AFP.

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Four-tusked ‘elephant’ on display at Bandung museum – in fossils


Skull fossils of an animal related to today’s elephant species that had four ivory tusks instead of two are currently exhibited at the Geology Museum in Bandung, West Java.

The items were discovered in the 1990s by the museum's research team in Wallanae Valley, South Sulawesi.

Visitors to the museum can also marvel at other interesting fossils at the exhibition, including of an ancient pig (Celebochoerus heekereni) and a giant turtle (Geochelone atlas).

As reported by tempo.co, the elephant-relates species that used to live in Sulawesi according to the fossils found include the Stegodon sompoensis, Stegodon sp. and Elephas celebensis, which refers to the four-tusked animal.

"The age of the ancient elephant's fossils is around 2 million years," said the head of the research team, Fachroel Aziz, a paleovertebrata expert, as quoted by tempo.co.

The fossils of the Stegodon in Sulawesi were first discovered by Dutch researcher Dirk Albert Hooijer in 1953. After his next findings in Sompoh area, he later proposed Stegodon sompoensis as a new species name.

A joint team of the Bandung Geology Research and Development Center and the University of Utrecht as well as the Netherlands' National Museum of Natural History did research in Wallanae Valley between 1989 and 1992. Among their findings were teeth and skull fossils.

Based on the size of their teeth, said Fachroel, the Stegodon sompoensis was considered a dwarf. "It was a small elephant, similar to a buffalo [in size]."

Meanwhile the Elephas celebensis that had four tusks was first found by Dutch researcher Heekeren in 1947. The two upper tusks are believed to have been used as a weapon and gouge. Meanwhile, the use of the pair of smaller, lower tusks is not yet known.

According to researcher Gert van den Berg, so far evidence of their existence in Indonesia has only been found in Sulawesi. During the Miosen era that ran from 23 to 5 million years ago, many of this species could be found in Asia.

"The Stegoloxodon was a relict in Sulawesi; since it was isolated, it was able to exist," he said, adding that elephants in Asia were extinct due to competition with later elephant species. (kes)

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Lethal virus detected in wild elephants


New Delhi: Scientists have detected multiple cases of a lethal haemorrhagic viral infection for the first time in wild elephant calves in India and raised concerns that it could threaten the long-term survival of some Asian elephant populations.

Wildlife officials in India have identified 13 lethal cases of elephant endotheliotropic herpes virus (EEHV) between 2013 and 2017, eight among them in elephant calves living among free-ranging wild herds, three in camp-raised orphans and two in captive-born calves.

Since the early-1990s, scientists have documented the deaths of more than 100 captive elephant calves from EEHV, a mammalian herpes virus that can cause acute haemorrhagic disease and that had been identified in 1990 in an elephant calf in a circus in Switzerland.

The International Elephant Foundation estimates EEHV has been responsible for the deaths of 20 per cent of all Asian elephant calves born in zoos and elephant housing facilities over the past 25 years.

The virus has since then also turned up in captive elephant calves in Borneo, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Singapore and Thailand, prompting some scientists to suggest that EEHV affects only captive elephants and that it had crossed into Asian elephants from African elephants.

"What is unusual is that we're seeing this infection among elephant calves in the wild," said Arun Zachariah, a wildlife veterinarian with Kerala's forest and wildlife department at Sultan Bathery in Wayanad. Almost all previous cases in Asia were in captive-born calves or rescued camp orphans.

Zachariah had first documented EEHV infections in nine elephant calves between 2005 and 2011, including four wild free-ranging calves, three rescued orphans and two captive-born calves.

All the infections were reported from Kerala and one from Maharashtra. Zachariah said he had also confirmed one case of EEHV in a sample sent from Assam but did not hear from the forest officials again.

In their new study, Zachariah and his collaborators with SciGenom Research Foundation in Kerala and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the US have analysed segments of the EEHV genomes from the earlier set of nine calves and the 13 new infections up to 2017.

The study's findings, published on Thursday in the journal PLOS One, appear to corroborate earlier suggestions that despite the severity of the infection Asian elephants appear to be an ancient host for the EEHV virus.

"It is possible that Asian elephants and EEHV co-evolved over millions of years," Zachariah told The Telegraph. "We still need to understand why more cases appear to be emerging and why adult elephants appear protected."

The scientists say the widespread presence of the disease "raise serious concerns" about its impact on the long-term survival of the highly endangered Asian elephant populations and its challenge on efforts to breed elephants in captivity.

"Fragmented elephant populations may be at risk," Zachariah said. With growing pressures on wildlife habitats, conservation scientists have long been worried about habitat fragmentation leadingo the isolation of small elephant herds.

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Land owners have to explain elephant deaths


KOTA KINABALU: The State Government has invoked Section 33 of the State Wildlife Enactment which requires land owners to explain to the State wildlife director when an elephant is found dead on their property.

Deputy Chief Minister Christina Liew said a RM120,000 government reward for whistleblowers or eyewitnesses had not been able to stop the death and killing of elephants.

Due to the killing of a Borneo Pygmy Elephant mother which died of a head shot, and its baby, body missing and only innards were left at the scene, Liew added the ministry had no choice but to invoke the enactment.

“We will ask them to come and explain to the director, why is the elephant killed on your land? We want him to explain and this we have to turn to this last resort already. The senseless killings have been going on quite rampantly and we feel very sorry these elephants were killed unnecessarily.

“We do not know what is the motive but whatever it is, it has to be stopped. That is why we are invoking the act and this will take immediate effect from today,” she added after launching her ministry’s 50th anniversary celebration here.

Liew assured the state government would not go soft on owners of lands, whether located in the forest reserve or Yayasan Sabah concession areas, amongst others.

“Everybody. (It) applies across the board. Some people think that because the elephant was killed in the forest reserve or in the government’s land then we will be lenient. No, no more.

“We have been advising them. This human-elephant conflict has been going on long enough. We’ve done everything that we could. I found it getting bad now,” she explained, reiterating that the law would be enforced on all types of land owners, including smallholders and plantation owners.

Liew added in the future, a Special Animal Unit that would be handled by an American elephant expert.

On Wednesday, Sabah Wildlife director Augustine Tuuga revealed that 25 Borneo pygmy elephants were found dead this year, either shot or snared in traps in jungles and plantations in the state.

“This is the highest recorded so far,” Augustine said, referring to annual fatalities. Over 100 elephants have died in the last eight years in Sabah.

Conservation group WWF estimates that only around 1,500 elephants are left.

Baby-faced with oversized ears and long tails that drag on the ground, pygmy elephants are found on Borneo island which is shared by Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei.

Loss of habitat is the biggest threat for the pygmy elephants, with deforestation, logging and rapid expansion of palm oil plantations contributing to the decline in their population. The elephants also fall prey to poachers or traps set up to catch animals.

Authorities have been unable to determine the exact reasons for the higher number of deaths this year, but Augustine said they have noticed elephants spending more time outside of forests and in plantations.

The rich rainforests of Borneo are surrounded by vast palm oil plantations. Palm oil companies in Malaysia and Indonesia, the world’s top two producers of the vegetable oil, have been accused of doing little to protect wildlife and their habitat.

The latest reported death in Sabah was on Saturday, when wildlife officers found the slightly decomposed carcass of a female elephant in a plantation, with what they believe was a gunshot wound at its temple.

There have been at least two other deaths by shooting and many others caused by injuries from traps.

Bringing the killers to justice has proven to be difficult, due to the remoteness of the locations and the sheer lack of information and witnesses, Augustine said.

No witnesses have come forward despite a reward offer of RM120,000, he said.
WWF Malaysia called on palm oil companies to take more action.

Four male elephants died from snare injuries in the past two months and all of them were found in plantations bordering forest reserves, WWF said in a statement this week.

“Even more worrisome than the number of elephant deaths are the number of elephants that have died due to strategically placed snare traps within their habitat,” the conservation group said.

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Sunday, July 29, 2018

Sumatran elephant 'poisoned' in Indonesia palm plantation

BANDA ACEH: A critically endangered elephant has been found dead in a palm oil plantation on Indonesia's Sumatra island in what is suspected to be a deliberate poisoning, an official said Friday (Jul 13).

The 10-year-old female Sumatran elephant was found in Jambo Reuhat village in North Aceh on Thursday - the third of its species to be found dead of suspected poisoning in the same palm plantation since 2015.

"We found fruits and a pouch with traces of powder inside the animal," Aceh conservation centre head Sapto Aji Prabowo told AFP.

"We suspect the death was caused by deliberate poisoning because her liver and spleen turned dark, a classic sign of poison," he added.

A group of veterinarians was deployed to the location after authorities were tipped off by locals.

Officials estimated the animal had been dead for three days when the carcass was discovered.

Sumatran elephants are a critically endangered species. Rampant deforestation to create plantations has reduced their natural habitat and brought them into conflict with humans.

At least 11 wild elephants died in Aceh last year, most of them killed by humans.

Earlier in June a tame Sumatran elephant was found dead from apparent poisoning in East Aceh district with its tusks missing.

Officials found the remains of fruits laced with poison inside the animal during the autopsy.

The environment ministry estimates only around 500 Sumatran elephant remain in Aceh.

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Friday, July 20, 2018

Killing of Aceh elephant is an organized crime: Environment Ministry



Idi, Aceh (ANTARA News)- The Environmental Affairs and Forestry Ministry views the killing of a domesticated elephant in the Serbajadi Conservation Response Unit (CRU) in East Aceh District, Aceh Province, as an organized crime.

"The ministry and the Police`s Criminal Investigation Department are committed to investigating the death of the domesticated elephant," veterinarian Indra Exploitasia, director of biodiversity conservation of the ministry, noted at a press conference here, recently.

The criminal case must be investigated thoroughly, and the perpetrators, including the executors and mastermind, must be arrested, he emphasized.

"Elephants are protected under Law No. 5 of 1990 on KSDAE (Conservation of Ecosystem Natural Resources)," he remarked.

Moreover, the species has been included on the appendix 1 of the CITES list, due to which its trade is banned, as they are on the brink of extinction due to human encroachment.

Based on the 2016 census conducted by the Elephant Forum, the population of elephants in Indonesia reaches 1,724 heads.

Elephant poaching is an organized and transnational crime, according to Exploitasia.

The ministry will continue its fight against animal poaching and trafficking of flora and fauna, including ivory, which is in high demand.


To read the full article, click on the story title.

Sumatran elephant 'poisoned' in Indonesia palm plantation



INDONESIA:
A critically endangered elephant has been found dead in a palm oil plantation on Indonesia’s Sumatra island in what is suspected to be a deliberate poisoning, an official said on Friday.

The 10-year-old female Sumatran elephant was found in Jambo Reuhat village in North Aceh on Thursday the third of its species to be found dead of suspected poisoning in the same palm plantation since 2015.

“We found fruits and a pouch with traces of powder inside the animal,” Aceh conservation centre head Sapto Aji Prabowo said.

“We suspect the death was caused by deliberate poisoning because her liver and spleen turned dark, a classic sign of poison,” he added.


Killing of endangered Sumatran elephant sparks anger

A group of veterinarians was deployed to the location after authorities were tipped off by locals.

Officials estimated the animal had been dead for three days when the carcass was discovered.

Sumatran elephants are a critically endangered species. Rampant deforestation to create plantations has reduced their natural habitat and brought them into conflict with humans.

At least 11 wild elephants died in Aceh last year, most of them killed by humans.

Earlier in June a tame Sumatran elephant was found dead from apparent poisoning in East Aceh district with its tusks missing.


Officials found the remains of fruits laced with poison inside the animal during the autopsy.

The environment ministry estimates only around 500 Sumatran elephant remain in Aceh.


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Sumatran elephant 'poisoned' in Indonesia palm plantation



BANDA ACEH: A critically endangered elephant has been found dead in a palm oil plantation on Indonesia's Sumatra island in what is suspected to be a deliberate poisoning, an official said Friday (Jul 13).

The 10-year-old female Sumatran elephant was found in Jambo Reuhat village in North Aceh on Thursday - the third of its species to be found dead of suspected poisoning in the same palm plantation since 2015.


"We found fruits and a pouch with traces of powder inside the animal," Aceh conservation centre head Sapto Aji Prabowo told AFP.

"We suspect the death was caused by deliberate poisoning because her liver and spleen turned dark, a classic sign of poison," he added.

A group of veterinarians was deployed to the location after authorities were tipped off by locals.

Officials estimated the animal had been dead for three days when the carcass was discovered.


Sumatran elephants are a critically endangered species. Rampant deforestation to create plantations has reduced their natural habitat and brought them into conflict with humans.

At least 11 wild elephants died in Aceh last year, most of them killed by humans.

Earlier in June a tame Sumatran elephant was found dead from apparent poisoning in East Aceh district with its tusks missing.

Officials found the remains of fruits laced with poison inside the animal during the autopsy.

The environment ministry estimates only around 500 Sumatran elephant remain in Aceh.


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Friday, July 06, 2018

Indonesian police nab poachers of endangered elephant




JAKARTA, July 4 (Xinhua) -- Police in Indonesia's Aceh province have arrested two people allegedly killing of a protected Sumatra elephant and hacking off its tusks, a police officer said on Wednesday.
Police chief in Aceh Timur district Wahyu Kuncoro said the two perpetrators killed the endangered animal in the compound of Conservation Response Unit in Bunin village.
The killing of the elephant also involved two other poachers, whom the police were hunting for, Wahyu said in the district.
"Evidences in the forms of a big knife and a T-shirt were seized and claimed by the two as things owned by their friends. Now, we are pursuing their friends who have been on the run," he was quoted by Kompas media as saying.
According to the provincial conservation agency, the perpetrators likely fed the elephant with poisoned foods, a common modus operandi used by poachers in the area.
The Sumatran elephant, known as Elephas maximus sumatranus, is one of three recognized subspecies of the Asian elephants, and has habitats on Indonesia's Sumatra Island.
The elephant was declared critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (UNCN) in 2011, as its population has declined by 80 percent over the past decades.
The wild population of Sumatran elephants is now estimated at between 2,400 to 2,800.


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Indonesian Environment Minister Investigates The Killing of Bunta The Elephant



JAKARTA, NNC – The Minister of Environment and Forestry, Siti Nurbaya will conduct an evaluation of the “Conservation Response Unit-CRU” management after a tame elephant named Bunta was found dead in Jamur Batang Village, Bunin Village, Serbajadi Sub-district, East Aceh.

“We will evaluate (CRU). We will call them later along with the Director General,” she said, Wednesday (6/13/2018).

Sity Nurbaya admitted she is concerned about the killing of an elephant located just 400 meters away from the location of Serbuadi CRU. Supposedly the killing occured because of limited number of personnel.

The case of Bunta’s killing has been handled by local police, also assisted by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry and Natural Resources Conservation Center of Aceh.

Currently, the intestinal, spleen, cardiac and renal organ samplings have been performed for laboratory testing. Other samples taken were what was left of the left tusk and Bunta’s intact right tusk, measuring at 148 centimeters.

According to Natural Resources Conservation Center of Aceh, the temporary result shows that Bunta was poisoned. This is based on the damage and changes shown in the intestinal organs. Bunta’s bowel organs had internal bleeding, while the heart, liver and lungs were swollen.


To read the full article, click on the story title.

Elephant killed for ivory in East Aceh



A male elephant was found dead from poisoning in East Aceh, Aceh, on Sunday. One of its tusks had been removed. Bunta, 27, was part of the Conservation Response Unit (CRU) elephant team, which wards off wild elephants trying to enter the area. Bunta and three other elephants had been stationed at CRU Serbajadi in Bunin village, Serbajadi district, East Aceh, Aceh, since January 2016. The team was tasked with preventing animal-human conflicts in the area. Bunta was the main police elephant at CRU Serbajadi, which was visited by Hollywood actor Leonardo Di Caprio in March 2016. Based on information provided by the CRU Serbajadi team on Sunday, Bunta was found dead when a mahout went to relocate him from a forest located 500 meters from the CRU base camp to another area at 8 a.m. local time. He saw Bunta lying on the ground dead with one of his tusks missing. The mahout reported the incident to the Serbajadi Police, who forwarded the report to the East Aceh Police. East Aceh Police chief Adj.Sr.Comr.Wahyu Kuncoro said it appeared that the elephant had eaten poison-laced bananas and mangoes. “We are waiting for the […] the Aceh Natural Resources Conservation Agency’s veterinarian team to reveal cause of death.” (ebf)


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Poachers blamed in second Sumatran elephant death this year





AUTHORITIES in Indonesia have blamed poachers for the death of an elephant found with one of its tusks hacked off, in one of the world’s most biodiverse and threatened habitats.

The 27-year-old male Sumatran elephant, named Bunta, had since 2016 been regularly trained and employed by forest rangers in Aceh province as part of a unit to ward off wild elephants encroaching on farms and villages.

His body was found June 9 by forest rangers inside the Leuser Ecosystem, one of Indonesia’s last large tracts of intact rainforest, which is home to four of the most iconic and critically endangered species on Earth: the Sumatran elephant, tiger, rhino and orangutan.

Citing damage to the elephant’s digestive tract, and traces from fruit found near the carcass, officials from the Aceh conservation agency, or BKSDA, say it was likely that Bunta was poisoned — a common tactic used by poachers and farmers in the region.

“After the elephant died, one of its tusks was taken by slicing open its cheek,” Wahyu Kuncoro, of the East Aceh district police, told reporters a day after the body was found.

Sapto Aji Prabowo, the head of the Aceh BKSDA, lamented the elephant’s death and called on law enforcement to bring the perpetrators to justice.

“There’s a human who heartlessly killed this tame animal, this can’t be accepted by reason,” he said.

“We are absolutely at a loss at the passing of this male elephant,” he added. “Bunta was one of the elephants that we really relied on [for forest patrols].”

Under Indonesian conservation law, the killing, trading or distribution of protected species and their parts can incur jail sentences of up to five years and fines of up to 100 million rupiah ($7,160). But law enforcement on wildlife killings remains weak, with offenders rarely prosecuted. On the few occasions that cases make their way to court, the perpetrators typically receive token sentences or fines far below the maximum.


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Tuesday, May 15, 2018

The plight of the palm oil elephants



There are precious few elephants left in Borneo, and the population gets smaller every year.

Forests where they live are being slashed to make way for palm oil plantations, making it more and more difficult for elephants and farmers to thrive together in close quarters.

Photojournalist Aaron 'Bertie' Gekoski has been documenting the situation in southeast Asia.
A species in decline

It is thought that Borneo's elephants are a subspecies of the endangered Asian elephant (Elephus maximus), although scientists have yet to classify them as such.

According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Asian elephant populations have dwindled by 50% over the last three generations, as their habitats are shrinking and fragmenting.

Adult elephants can spend up to 19 hours a day feeding, and they roam for hundreds of kilometres through grassland, forests and scrubland. Their size means they need large areas of land to live comfortably - but their forest homes are being encroached upon by human homes, plantations and farms.

This pressure to find space has led to more and more conflicts between humans and elephants when elephants eat or trample crops. It's a particularly large problem in Indonesia and Malaysia, where huge areas of forests have been lost to palm oil plantations.

The plight of the elephants is perfectly captured in the image above, Palm-oil survivors, by environmental photojournalist Aaron Gekoski. It is in the current Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition.

Taken on a cleared palm oil plantation in Borneo, in the Malaysian state of Sabah, three generations of elephants are dwarfed by a scene of devastation around them.

With the light fading fast he quickly shot the four majestic mammals, reflecting on how they are 'dwarfed by a desolate and desecrated landscape'.




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Saturday, May 05, 2018

Critically endangered Javan Rhino dies in Indonesia





A Javan rhino has died in Indonesia, the environment ministry said today, bringing the critically endangered mammals closer to extinction with just 60 believed to be still living in the wild.

The body of the male rhino was found inside West Java's Ujung Kulon national park, the creature's last remaining habitat.


Its death was believed to be from old age rather than poaching.

The animal has been driven to the brink of extinction as their horns are highly valued in traditional Chinese and Korean medicine, although most countries in the region have banned the trade.

"We found it on (Monday) and are now performing an autopsy," said environment ministry spokesman Djati Witjaksono Hadi.

The 40-year-old rhino didn't had any offspring, he added.

Javan and Sumatran rhinos are classified as "critically endangered" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

The Javan rhino is distinguished from African rhinos by its smaller size, single horn and loose skin folds which give it the appearance of wearing armour plating.

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Monday, April 23, 2018

Chicco Jerikho on mission to save Sumatran elephant



Actor Chicco Jerikho is set to conduct a fundraising campaign for the preservation of the Sumatran elephant during his first-ever participation in the London Marathon on April 22.

According to tempo.co, Chicco is inviting the public to donate Rp 100,000 through the Elephantastic Run campaign website until April 23, with all proceeds to go to the conservation program. Registered participants can either run or walk a minimum distance of 5 kilometers anytime, anywhere from April 21 to 23.

Cities included in the Elephantastic Run, which is where the public can join the campaign, are Pekanbaru in Riau on April 15, and Jakarta, Banda Aceh in Aceh and Surabaya in East Java on April 22. The Sumatran elephant population in Riau has sharply declined from 1,300 in 1984 to only 300 to 330 in 2009, according to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Indonesia and the Riau Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA).

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Sunday, March 18, 2018

Smoking orangutan stirs anger against zoo in Indonesia

JAKARTA, Indonesia — A video of an orangutan smoking has brought more criticism of a zoo in Indonesia infamous for past animal welfare troubles.

In the video shot Sunday, a young man flicks his half-smoked cigarette into the primate's enclosure. It's picked up by the reddish-brown primate, who expertly puffs on it to laughter from the crowd. 

Activist Marison Guciano said Wednesday the smoking ape is further evidence of a lack of supervision and education at Bandung Zoo, about 75 miles southwest of the capital, Jakarta.

Guciano said the man committed a crime but the privately owned zoo is mainly responsible because of its "ignorance of supervision and education for visitors."

The zoo has repeatedly made headlines for starving and sick animals. It was temporarily closed in 2016 after a Sumatran elephant that died was found to have bruises on its body.

A change.org petition calling for Bandung Zoo to be closed has nearly 1 million signatures. Visitors who review the zoo on TripAdvisor describe a dirty facility and sadness and anger at seeing the condition of the animals.

Zoo spokesman Sulhan Syafi'I said "we very much regret that such a thing happened" and the incident was reported to police.

Signs at the zoo warn visitors to not feed animals or give them cigarettes, he said.

Substandard conditions are common at Indonesian zoos and Guciano blamed the government for being slow in establishing animal welfare standards. 

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Friday, March 16, 2018

Indonesia Sumatran elephant found dead from suspected gunshots

Jakarta An elephant from the critically endangered Sumatran species has been found dead inside an Indonesian national park with what appear to be bullet wounds, the environment ministry said Wednesday. The female elephant was discovered in Sumatra's Way Kambas National Park on Monday. (AFP)

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Sunday, February 18, 2018

Critically Endangered Sumatran Elephant Gives Birth In Indonesia

SUMATRA: A critically endangered Sumatran elephant has given birth to a new calf in Indonesia, the country’s conservation agency said yesterday.

Sumatran elephants are a protected species, but rampant deforestation for plantations has reduced their natural habitat and brought them into conflict with humans.

The newborn was found with its 40-year old mother Seruni, who was being closely monitored by the agency in anticipation of the birth inside a conservation forest in Riau on the island of Sumatra.–Agencies

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Poachers blamed as body of Sumatran elephant, missing tusks, found in protected forest

Farmers in southern Sumatra found the body of a young male elephant inside a protected forest and missing its tusks.

No external injuries were found that could point to a cause of death, leading wildlife activists to suspect it was killed by poisoning, a common tactic used by poachers.

The discovery comes less than a month after a pregnant elephant was found poisoned to death in northern Sumatra — although in that case the tuskless female appeared more likely to have been killed for encroaching on farms than by poachers.

PALEMBANG, Indonesia — Wildlife activists in Indonesia suspect poachers poisoned an elephant found with its tusks hacked off in a protected forest in southern Sumatra.

The body of the male Sumatran elephant (Elephas maximus sumatranus), believed to be about 10 years old, was found Sunday by local farmers in a community plantation within the Mount Raya protected forest area, which borders Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park in South Sumatra province. The park is also home to critically endangered Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sondaica), rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) and orangutans (Pongo abelii), all of which faced increased threats from greater human incursion into their habitats as a result of road projects.

Citing a lack of wounds on the body, wildlife activists believe the elephant was killed by poisoning — a common tactic used by poachers in the region.

Muhroni, a wildlife expert with the environmental NGO Jejak Indonesia, who inspected the body, said the perpetrators likely sprayed the poison on grass, small plants and bushes outside the community plantation. If that’s the case, other elephants from the herd that the young male belonged to could also be in danger, he warned.

Authorities are conducting tests to determine the cause of death.

The discovery on Sunday came less than a month after a pregnant elephant was found dead in an oil palm plantation in Sumatra’s northernmost province of Aceh on Dec. 22.

In that case, authorities said an autopsy showed general signs of poisoning, including the digestive organs having turned black. The elephant was an estimated 25 years old and believed to be at least six months short of giving birth. It did not have tusks, as is typical for female Sumatran elephants.

High rates of deforestation throughout much of Sumatra, primarily for monoculture plantations such as oil palms, rubber and pulpwood, have driven native wildlife from their habitats and into more frequent conflicts with humans. Orangutans and elephants, in particular, are seen as pests by farmers for raiding crops and trampling plants. Locals have in many cases resorted to poisoning or shooting the animals.

Poisoning is also used by poachers targeting the elephants’ tusks. The average wholesale price for ivory in China, one of the key markets for the commodity, was $730 per kilogram (2.2 pounds) in February 2017, according to the Save the Elephants.

There are only an estimated 2,400 Sumatran elephants left in the wild, scattered across 25 fragmented habitats on the island.

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Sunday, February 11, 2018

Pregnant Elephant Found Poisoned At Oil Plantation In Indonesia

At the end of December 2017, a 25 year old pregnant elephant and her unborn baby were found dead on a palm oil plantation in Sumatra. Authorities suspect that the animal had been poisoned by farmers, who blamed the elephant for eating their fertilizer.

She was the 11th elephant to die in the region that year. Saputo Aji Prabowo, head of the Aceh Conservation Center, said:From the autopsy, we saw that its digestive organs turned black which the doctor said was a general indication of poisoning.

Palm Oil: wildlife’s curse

Palm oil production, for many reasons, often has a devastating effect on animals and plants. Over-deforestation has become a problem in the area due to the number of oil plantations, which are growing in number because it is so profitable.

By losing their natural habitat, orangutan and elephant populations have no choice but to move closer to humans to find food, which often results in conflict when they run into humans. Orangutans and elephants in Sumatra are considered critically endangered and if nothing is done, these species will join the list of the many animals that are already extinct.

Scott Blais, the director of the charity Global Sanctuary for Elephants, told website The Dodo:

We must start to see and to recognize each individual as a life with purpose, as someone who is integral to their society and a being who has the right to live within a world that is theirs.

Head of communications for International Animal Resuce, Lis Key said:

It is vital and urgent that solutions are found if we are to stop critically endangered species like the elephant and the orangutan from vanishing forever.

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Monday, January 08, 2018

Tesso Nilo National Park welcomes newborn elephant

The elephant population at the Tesso Nilo National Park in Pelalawan regency, Riau, has grown as a Sumatran elephant gave birth on Tuesday.

The healthy male elephant was named Harmoni Rimbo and quickly became the center of attention at the Tesso Nilo Festival held in the park from Wednesday to Friday.

“The birth of the baby elephant should encourage all concerned parties that there is still hope [for elephants to live] in the Tesso Nilo National Park,” Wiratno, the Environment and Forestry Ministry’s director general for natural resources and the ecosystem, told Antara on Thursday.

Harmoni Rimbo, or simply Har, was born after cross-mating a male wild elephant and a captive female elephant named Ria, which belongs to the Tesso Nilo Elephant Flying Squad, a joint operation of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Indonesia and the Conservation Authority of Riau.

Har is the sixth elephant to be born since the Elephant Flying Squad was formed in 2004.

Ria was detected to be pregnant in May last year. She has already given birth to two elephants, one in 2011 and the second in 2014.

Tesso Nilo Natinal Park chairman Supartono said with the birth of Harmoni Rimbo the park now has eight domesticated elephants.

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Friday, December 22, 2017

Tesso Nilo National Park welcomes newborn elephant

The elephant population at the Tesso Nilo National Park in Pelalawan regency, Riau, has grown as a Sumatran elephant gave birth on Tuesday.

The healthy male elephant was named Harmoni Rimbo and quickly became the center of attention at the Tesso Nilo Festival held in the park from Wednesday to Friday.

“The birth of the baby elephant should encourage all concerned parties that there is still hope [for elephants to live] in the Tesso Nilo National Park,” Wiratno, the Environment and Forestry Ministry’s director general for natural resources and the ecosystem, told Antara on Thursday.

Harmoni Rimbo, or simply Har, was born after cross-mating a male wild elephant and a captive female elephant named Ria, which belongs to the Tesso Nilo Elephant Flying Squad, a joint operation of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Indonesia and the Conservation Authority of Riau.

Har is the sixth elephant to be born since the Elephant Flying Squad was formed in 2004.

Ria was detected to be pregnant in May last year. She has already given birth to two elephants, one in 2011 and the second in 2014.

Tesso Nilo Natinal Park chairman Supartono said with the birth of Harmoni Rimbo the park now has eight healthy male elephant.

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Saturday, December 02, 2017

Saba warns of elephant 'holocaust'

"It's such a pleasant, relaxing experience – in Kenya you are never far away from instant death on the roads from potholes, animals or other drivers," she laughs.

The elephant conservationist and TV presenter stopped off in Bewdley to meet its small elephant family during a UK-wide tour promoting her work with elephants in Africa.

With her husband Frank Pope, she runs the Save The Elephants(STE) charity, started by her zoologist father Ian Douglas-Hamilton in 1993. She was born in the Great Rift Valley in Kenya on June 7 at 7pm on the seventh day of the week, and became the seventh grandchild in the family. Her name means 'seven' in Swahili.

She met her first wild animal, an elephant called Virgo, when she was six weeks old and with her sister, Mara, grew up in the African bush learning bush-lore from the rangers and absorbing all there was to know about elephants, just like her own three children now.

Her first job after leaving St Andrews University in Scotland with a Masters degree in social anthropology was with the Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia and she went on to work in academia before joining STE as chief operations officer.

It was here she was talent-spotted by the BBC and has since presented several wildlife series, including Secret Life of Elephants, Unknown Africa and Big Cat Diary.

She currently runs the family’s luxury tented eco-lodge, Elephant Watch Camp, started by her mother Oria, a pioneer in conservation tourism, which offers holidaymakers the chance to live under canvas observing wildlife at close range.

In between times, she lectures extensively to raise awareness about conservation issues. Her message is simple: elephants are in crisis.

She identifies two elephant 'holocausts'. During the first, in the 1970s – 80s, the African elephant population plummeted by half, from 1.3 million to 600,000 in a decade due to the illegal ivory trade .

After a long global campaign, when STE teamed up with CITES(the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species), a ban on international ivory trade was brought in and had an immediate effect.

"Almost overnight the price of ivory dropped, except for places like the Congo, and a 25-year ceasefire allowed elephants to recover," says Saba.

"But the South African countries - Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia - were pushing to re-open trade as they felt they were being punished for their good custodianship of their elephant populations."

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Saturday, November 25, 2017

Tesso Nilo National Park welcomes newborn elephant

The elephant population at the Tesso Nilo National Park in Pelalawan regency, Riau, has grown as a Sumatran elephant gave birth on Tuesday.

The healthy male elephant was named Harmoni Rimbo and quickly became the center of attention at the Tesso Nilo Festival held in the park from Wednesday to Friday.

“The birth of the baby elephant should encourage all concerned parties that there is still hope [for elephants to live] in the Tesso Nilo National Park,” Wiratno, the Environment and Forestry Ministry’s director general for natural resources and the ecosystem, told Antara on Thursday.

Harmoni Rimbo, or simply Har, was born after cross-mating a male wild elephant and a captive female elephant named Ria, which belongs to the Tesso Nilo Elephant Flying Squad, a joint operation of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Indonesia and the Conservation Authority of Riau.

Har is the sixth elephant to be born since the Elephant Flying Squad was formed in 2004.

Ria was detected to be pregnant in May last year. She has already given birth to two elephants, one in 2011 and the second in 2014.

Tesso Nilo Natinal Park chairman Supartono said with the birth of Harmoni Rimbo the park now has eight domesticated elephants.

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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Baby Elephant in North Sumatra Dead to Pit

Medan - An elephant baby was found dead after falling into a hole in North Sumatra (North Sumatra). Baby elephant is not yet known gender.

"In the location was found the baby elephant in a dead state due to mired in the hole that was allegedly stump of wood," said Head of Administration BBKSDA Sumut, Tri Atmojo in his office in Medan, Wednesday (25/10/2017). Tri said that the elephant was found dead in Sumber Waras Village, Sei Serdang Village, Batang Serangan District, Langkat Regency on Saturday (21/10). The team of 20 people together with the residents then checked the next day because previously the conditions in not possible to evacuate the elephant carcass.

"The condition of the carcass of an elephant is mired in a half-body with a condition of four feet in the ground, only the back and head are left, then the team buries in the location by piling up the soil," he continued.

In Sumber Waras Village, there are 20 tonutmeg family. People there, according to Tri working in oil palm plantations. The distance between the Dusun and TNGL area is about 1 km.

"From the results of checking the animal conflict team that there are no suspicious signs such as poison, trap, or anything else," said Tri.

Meanwhile, veterinarian BBKSDA Sumut, drh Tia Zalia Batubara said the baby elephant died is estimated 3-4 days.

"The age is estimated to be under a year, still the process of suckling the elephant child.Gender is not yet known, elephants are buried in the same location.The size of the elephant is about 110 cm long," said Tia.

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Monday, October 30, 2017

Baby Elephant in North Sumatra Dead to Pit

Medan - An elephant baby was found dead after falling into a hole in North Sumatra (North Sumatra). Baby elephant is not yet known gender.

"In the location was found the baby elephant in a dead state due to mired in the hole that was allegedly stump of wood," said Head of Administration BBKSDA Sumut, Tri Atmojo in his office in Medan, Wednesday (25/10/2017). Tri said that the elephant was found dead in Sumber Waras Village, Sei Serdang Village, Batang Serangan District, Langkat Regency on Saturday (21/10). The team of 20 people together with the residents then checked the next day because previously the conditions in not possible to evacuate the elephant carcass.

"The condition of the carcass of an elephant is mired in a half-body with a condition of four feet in the ground, only the back and head are left, then the team buries in the location by piling up the soil," he continued.

In Sumber Waras Village, there are 20 tonutmeg family. People there, according to Tri working in oil palm plantations. The distance between the Dusun and TNGL area is about 1 km.

"From the results of checking the animal conflict team that there are no suspicious signs such as poison, trap, or anything else," said Tri.

Meanwhile, veterinarian BBKSDA Sumut, drh Tia Zalia Batubara said the baby elephant died is estimated 3-4 days.

"The age is estimated to be under a year, still the process of suckling the elephant child.Gender is not yet known, elephants are buried in the same location.The size of the elephant is about 110 cm long," said Tia.

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Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Two rare elephants die due to electric fence in Indonesia

Two extremely rare elephants have died after being electrocuted by a fence in the search for food. The Sumatran elephants were killed by suspected electrocution in Indonesia’s Aceh province, according to local media.

The dead animals’ bodies were found, with their tusks still intact, indicating that poachers were not responsible for their death.

Aceh performing an autopsy on two Sumatran elephants which were shocked by a plantation fence in Aceh Timur District, on October 17, 2017.

Many residents in the local area have installed electrical fences around their land or homes to prevent
animal attacks and to protect their crops.

Sumatran elephants are a critically endangered species and there are fewer than 3,000 left in the wild, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

The elephants’ habitat has been devastated by industrial activities such as logging.

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Saturday, October 14, 2017

An Indonesian Flying Squad saves wild Elephants from Harm

When wild elephants begin trampling around plantations in search of food, they may unwittingly place themselves at risk. Irate farmers may take their anger out on the gentle giants by shooting or poisoning them. That is why officials and conservationists have to ask fast whenever elephants show up at plantations.

This is where a special rescue unit operating in Indonesia comes in. Called the Flying Squad thanks to the speed with which it operates, the unit involves four domesticated elephants and nine mahouts. Their job is to patrol parts of the northern border of Tesso Nilo National Park in Sumatra and ensure that wild elephants and local farmers can peacefully coexist.

As soon as elephants begin raiding orchards and plantations, the join pachyderm-human squad rushes to the scene to coax the wild elephants back into the forest. “Conflict can arise when people view these elephants as a threat to crops. The objective of the Flying Squad is to detect and herd wild elephants away from residential areas,” Didik Purwanto, a local expert, was quoted as saying by the Jakarta Post.

“The task is to help herd them back, not to capture them,” he elucidated. “The team monitors the wild elephants twice weekly by tracking their movements to areas that are off-limits. When they do spot elephants or when there are reports of them leaving the national park, they are immediately herded back to the park to prevent them from destroying crops or even killing people.”

The initiative is a project overseen in part by the World Wide Fund for Nature and was set up in response to the increasing number of human-elephant conflicts in Sumatra. Such conflicts have intensified as a result of the ongoing loss of forests that wild elephants have called home. Deforestation has had a marked impact on local biodiversity while human settlements and plantations have also been encroaching on the natural habitats of the area’s pachyderms. Several elephants have been killed in recent years, likely by people working for local pulp mills and palm oil plantations.

The Flying Squad has been successful in reducing the number of deadly conflicts. “Local residents are happy with the Flying Squad’s presence, which is saving elephant’s lives as well as protecting community cultivation,” said one of the mahouts on the team. The idea is that wild elephants will respond better to the presence of other elephants and will be less likely to fight back than if they were faced with humans alone. Such flying squads have long been in use in places like India to monitor wild elephant herds and stop them from straying into cultivated fields and adjoining villages. They might come in handy in Malaysia too.

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Friday, September 01, 2017

Customs puzzled how jumbo tusk smuggled into Kalimantan

The State Customs Department has not received any information on the elephant tusk that allegedly made its way across the border to North Kalimatan via Tawau. The department said it is their normal practice to conduct detailed inspections at all times not only on suspicious containers but all luggage and items going through Customs check.

"We did not detect any elephant tusk, we will be informed if there was any," said State Customs Director Datuk Dr Janathan Kandok.

Malaysian Insight picked up the news from CNN Indonesia that a single tusk, weighing about 2.7kg and covered in a sack of fertiliser, was confiscated from a foreign worker as he entered Nunukan on July 24.

The 50-year-old man from East Nusa Tenggara allegedly told Indonesian police he bought the tusk from a Malaysian for RM1,500.

It also quoted a Sabah conservationists who claimed that the man went through proper channels, raising questions as to how enforcement officers at the Tawau checkpoint could have missed detecting the item in the man's luggage before he left the State.

In response to this, Janathan said that it is their opinion, stressing that they have not detected anything thus far. "We have not detected anything, which means the item could not have passed through legal landing place, even if they had entered the State, they would have to go through checkpoints at airports or ports, the item is too big, and surely it cannot go through without being detected.

"The tusk is big and in my opinion, how many tusks do we have in Sabah, it could perhaps be from another place and brought here.

"But whatever it is we have and will tighten our controls," he said.

Five elephant tusks seized from a woman at the Customs, Immigration and Quarantine station in Nunukan, North Kalimantan, Indonesia, in January this year.

Indonesia's news portal Kompas said a woman who claimed to be heading to Flores was halted by the country's immigration authorities in Nunukan for carrying the tusks.

The report further said the woman was released after explaining that the items do not belong to her but she was just entrusted to carry them.

The tusks were found hidden in the woman's bag as it passed through the Indonesian Customs X-ray machine with the Indonesian authorities valuing the items at RM33,000 (or Rp 100 million).

Killing elephants for their ivory is unheard of in Sabah who have previously been poisoned to death for being a "nuisance" in plantations or ended up dead after being stuck in a quarry pit at the most.

However, the grim discovery of a decapitated bull pygmy elephant in the vicinity of the Ulu Segama Forest reserve in January this year may be an indication that the world crackdown on the ivory trade lately is making poachers try their luck in Sabah.

It was learnt that a single shotgun was fired at a male jumbo at an oil palm plantation boundary next to the Ulu Segama Forest Reserve. Its trunk was chopped off, its head hacked and tusks had disappeared without a trace.

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Sunday, August 27, 2017

Taman Safari's animal parade pays tribute to Independence

Thousands of visitors packed Taman Safari Indonesia (TSI) in Bogor, West Java, to observe and photograph the unique species that featured in an animal parade on Sunday to celebrate the 72nd anniversary of Indonesian independence.

Seventy-nine animals were exhibited in the parade held on Aug. 19 and Aug. 20, including tigers, elephants, several species of birds and snakes, and camels.

Taman Safari spokesperson Yulius said the animal parade was an annual event and was held not only to entertain the park's visitors, but also to encourage them to care more about animals, especially species endemic to the Indonesian archipelago.

Ahead of Independence Day, TSI announced that 54 species had been born in 2017 at its conservation center, including a Kalimantan orangutan. The park is now awaiting the birth of a calf of the Javanese wild bull, which was conceived through artificial insemination.

TSI director Jansen Manansang said that of the 54 animals comprising exotic and endemic species successfully bred at the conservation park, 16 were rare and protected species: a Komodo dragon, a Javan hawk-eagle, a lesser bird-of-paradise, a Malay tapir, Goffin’s cockatoos and Javan green magpies.

Jansen said announcing the successful breeding of these species was more special because it coincided with Independence Day. Taman Safari could thus show its contributions to developing the country through the conservation of endemic species, he added.

TSI’s conservation activities began in 1980, when it took part in efforts to mitigate elephant-human conflicts, including initiating the establishment of Indonesia’s first elephant training center in Way Kambas, Lampung.


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Saturday, August 19, 2017

Workers from BKSDA try to examine wounded Sumatran elephant in Indonesia

Workers from Aceh Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) gather to examine a Sumatran elephant after it has been shot by hunters in Aceh, Indonesia on Aug. 16, 2017. BKSDA said that the population of Sumatran elephant has continued to decline in recent years.

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Saturday, July 15, 2017

Body of Unidentified Woman Found Near Elephant Enclosure at Ragunan Zoo

The body of an unidentified woman was found near the elephant enclosure at Ragunan Zoo in Pasar Minggu, South Jakarta, at around noon on Tuesday (27/06).

Adj. Sr. Comr. Juang Andi Priyanto, head of the South Jakarta Police's operational department, said the woman is believed to have been a hawker selling coffee, because she had sachets of instant coffee in her bag and a thermos flask containing hot water. However, she had no form of identification.

"There is no indication that she may have been attacked. We still don't know the cause of death. Several visitors were questioned, but nobody was able to shed light on the woman's identity. Her body was taken to Fatmawati Hospital in South Jakarta for an examination" Juang said.

Ragunan Zoo is a popular spot for holidaymakers during Idul Fitri.

"The zoo received at least 130,325 visitors over the holiday period," Juang said.

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Wednesday, July 05, 2017

Body of Indonesian believed trampled to death by elephant found

The lifeless body of an Indonesian plantation worker believed to have been trampled to death by a wild elephant was found in Ladang Tunjuk Laut, Tanjung Sedili, near here, today.

The victim, known as Sofian Adi, 33, is believed to have been missing since yesterday.

Kota Tinggi Fire and Rescue Station operations commander, Rahman Hashim said they received information of a man missing at 8.57am yesterday before rushing to the scene along with six members and two four-wheel drive vehicles.

“The victim’s body was found at around 12.50pm by a plantation worker who was conducting a search operation. The worker found the victim’s shoe first before finding the body about 100 metres from the shoe,” he said when contacted here today.

“We were told another friend of the victim suffered injuries during the attack and is receiving treatment,” said Rahman.

Meanwhile, Kota Tinggi district police chief, Supt Ahsmon Bajah, confirmed that the body was that of the Indonesian plantation worker.

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Sunday, May 21, 2017

4 states conduct elephant census, population rise documented

Four states came together to coordinate with each other for a composite elephant census and study. The census came to an end on Friday at West Midnapore's Goaltore. On March this year, Bengal, Odisha, Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand decided to conduct a census from May 10 to 12.

The dates were deliberately chosen as the sighting of elephants was expected to be easier on the night of May 10, which was a full moon night. Elephant experts often say that these four states together have the maximum numbers of human-elephant conflict.

However, on the other hand, a sizable portion of the population here worships the elephant as a god. In a recent incident, at Goaltore's Dudhpathari, local villagers treated an ailing elephant which was suffering from dehydration.

"We undertook block counting, water hole and line transect dung count methods to count the number of elephants in the region. The data will be compiled in a specific format and sent to the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change for analysis," said Vijay Kumar Salimath, the Burdwan DFO.

Block sampling with direct counting method basically means taking samples from the selected block randomly across the entire division. In this method, for each division, approximately 50 per cent of the forest beat areas to be randomly chosen and to be demarcated as census block.

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Indonesian rangers dismantle traps to save wildlife

An Indonesian forest ranger with a trap set up by poachers to capture elephants in the Leuser Ecosystem rainforest, located mostly within the province of Aceh on the island of Sumatra.

LEUSER, Indonesia (AFP) - In the depths of Indonesia's dense Leuser rain forest, a group of rangers are searching for traps set by poachers which are endangering rare wildlife.

Scientists and conservationists consider the Leuser Ecosystem, which falls mostly within Aceh province on Sumatra island, to be among the most important forests left in Southeast Asia.

It is the last place of sufficient size and quality to support viable populations of rare species like orangutans, Sumatran tigers, rhinoceroses, elephants, clouded leopards and sun bears.

"The rangers are trained to track signs indicating that there were poachers in the area, such as by looking for cigarette ends or footsteps," said Rudi Putra, head of the forum.

Some traps are designed to snare animals' feet. Others consist of spears set high up in trees, which would fall when a trap is sprung.

The rangers also watch for signs of deforestation such as illegal logging, and collect data from the forest for further research.

Poachers typically set up traps to capture elephants, tigers and bears so they can sell them illegally and make money.

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Thursday, May 11, 2017

Elephant attack on tour operator in Bali, Indonesia leads to loss of life

BALI, INDONESIA — An elephant handler on the Indonesian holiday island of Bali, was horribly killed on April 28 when the animal he had planned to feed, snapped.

The deceased is Balinese man I Nyoman Levi, the owner of an elephant tour and rafting concern.

According to eyewitnesses, Levi and two other handlers went to the elephant cage around noon to feed the animals. As Levi began the feeding, a bull elephant named Lampung attacked. Other handlers watched as Lampung wrapped its trunk around Levi, lifted him up, then smashed him into the ground with brutal force. Levi lost consciousness.

The other handlers swiftly delivered a smashed Levi to the hospital, but his injuries were too severe. Levi died shortly after arriving.

A post-mortem exam, revealed nasty gashes on his head and the right side of his chest, according to the Bali Post.

Police, stating the obvious, have recorded Levi’s death as a workplace accident. One of the hazards of working with unrestrained giant animals, unfortunately. Rest in peace, Levi.

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Indonesia: Hungry elephants in Sumatra destroy local plantations

Locals have called on authorities to take action to drive away three wild elephants, which came close to residential areas in Bengkalis regency, Riau province and destroyed palm and crop plantations.

The herd of the endangered animal had visited Jl. Rangau, Pematang Pudu subdistrict, Mandau district, in the past two weeks, but it was only in the past week that they began eating the local’s plantations, local Nimrot Sinaga said.

“They also destroyed an 8-hectare 3-year old palm plantation, which belongs to my parents,” he said on Friday.

The elephants usually came at night, he said, adding that he and the other residents tried to drive the elephants away using firecrackers. However, the elephants remained circling the area as other residents also tried to cast them away from the opposite direction.

He predicted that the three elephants are one family as they comprised of two adults and one calf around five years old.

“We expect the Riau Natural Resource Conservation Agency [BKSDA] will soon deploy a tamed elephant to lead the wild elephants away from the plantations and residences,” he said.

Tamed elephants are usually used to mitigate conflict between wild elephants and humans.

Nimrot said if authorities did not take swift action, he feared the local people would not be able to contain their anger as their palm plantations were eaten by the elephants. He said the elephants ate the palm shoots, which will kill the trees.

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Friday, April 14, 2017

Endangered Sumatran Elephants – Threats and Conservation

Indonesia is known as a country that has a large area of rain forest. Having over 18,000 islands, Indonesia contains the world’s third largest area of rain forest after Amazon and Africa’s Congo Basin. The forests of Borneo and Sumatra are islands that contain rain forest the most in Indonesia.

The forest of Sumatra is among the most biologically habitats on earth and high numbers of unique plants and animals may be found there. Sumatra is the Southeast Asian island that is located on the Equator and becomes a home to some of the world’s most diverse rain forest. This island is the world’s sixth largest island.

Habitat Loss

Then, due to its tropical climate, thousands of unique species live there. In recent years, massive habitat loss of these animals makes them to the very edge of survival. They are very rare to be seen in their natural habitat. Some of the endangered animals are Sumatran tigers, orangutans, Sumatran elephant, and Sumatran rhinos.

Therefore, through this article we will be focus on endangered Sumatran elephant, as one of Endangered Animals in Indonesia. We will discuss about its characteristic, behavior, and the conservation. We hope that you will understand this animal better after reading this article.

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Thursday, March 23, 2017

Starving Sumatran elephant shot is paying price of palm oil

The ivory trade is often what we associate with elephants’ endangered status, but there are other equally destructive culprits. For Sumatran elephants, a species found in the forests of Southeast Asia, that offender may be resting a little closer to home in our kitchen cabinets. That’s because this species of elephant is subject to persecution and habitat destruction in connection with the palm oil industry.

Palm oil has quickly become the go-to ingredient in as much as half of all consumer goods we buy – from pie crusts and peanut butter to toothpaste and household cleaners. And as its usage expands, more and more land is required to grow the fruit from which this oil derives. As a result, it’s estimated that an area the size of 300 football fields is cleared in the Sumatran rainforests every hour in order for new palm oil plantations to take root.

These forests are the primary habitat for a number of endangered species, who, in addition to becoming homeless, are losing their sources of food and water and, ultimately, their means to survive. But as if that wasn’t torturous enough, they are also forced to deal with the heavy-handedness of profit-chasing palm plantation workers, who consider these animals pests.

For Sumatran elephants, wandering anywhere near a palm plantation in search of food or a secure resting place often results in physical harm or death, whether through poisoning or physical weaponry. Babies regularly become orphaned when their mothers are attacked, but industry workers take no issue in violating the youngsters themselves.

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Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Paichit – the baby elephant saved from a palm oil plantation in Indonesia

Orphaned at a few months old and nursed back to health by a local wildlife centre, Paichit’s story has serious implications for critically endangered Sumatran elephants

Pushing on 400 kilograms, baby Paichit knows when it’s feeding time.

He lets out an appreciative bellow, a rumbling baby elephant purr from his patch in the Sumatran jungle, as soon as his mahout (keeper) Julkarnaini approaches bucket in hand.

“He’s getting much healthier,” observes Julkarnaini, now using the bucket to give Paichit a bit of a bath. “At first he was very thin, but after a month here he’s putting on weight.”

Earlier this year baby Paichit, one of the critically endangered Sumatran elephants, was found stranded and starving in a palm oil plantation in Aceh, on the northern tip of Indonesia’s Sumatra island. Paichit’s father had been shot and the rest of the herd had fled in fright.

When he was discovered, Paichit was so malnourished the shape of his ribs was visible from beneath his sagging skin. On arrival at a centre run by the Aceh Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA), an intravenous drip was immediately fixed to his ear.

“Paichit was really in a bad condition when he first arrived, he was very dehydrated, he was suffering from shock, stress and he was very thin, malnourished, and his skin was in a bad way,” recalls BKSDA veterinarian, Dr Rosa Wahyuni.

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Wednesday, March 01, 2017

Indonesia: Sumatra elephants' habitat continues to shrink: NGO

Bengkulu (ANTARA News) - The habitat of Sumatra elephants (Elephas Maximus Sumatranus), which continues to shrink, has sparked more conflict between the endangered species and humans, an NGO working in the field of nature conservation has said.

"Conflict (with humans) has occurred more often because the habitat of the elephants has continued to shrink. In the latest incident, wild elephants roaming the Gajah Makmur village led to a feeling of restlessness among the villagers," the program coordinator of the Nature Conservation Alliance (Akar) Network, Ali Akbar, said here on Friday.

An investigation conducted by the Akar Network found that the corridor that is the elephants roaming track in the Seblat Nature Tourism Park has increasingly shrunk due to changing patterns of land use.

The cultivation rights awarded to some plantations and illegal land clearing have led to a situation where elephants feel annoyed in their own habitat.

"The wild elephants entering the village came from Seblat Park, having passed through the oil palm plantation of PT Alno to HPT Air Rami, but then found themselves trapped in Air Rami," he explained.

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Saturday, February 18, 2017

Critically endangered Sumatran elephant dies in Indonesian zoo, sparking anger from politicians

A critically endangered Sumatran elephant has become the latest animal to die in one of Indonesia's ill-maintained zoos, an official said, sparking anger from activists and politicians.

The 34-year-old female elephant, called Yani, died in the city of Bandung on the island of Java island on Wednesday after falling ill a week earlier.

Many of the country's zoos are in poor condition and house animals in filthy, cramped enclosures.

The most notorious, in the city of Surabaya, has been dubbed the "death zoo" as hundreds of animals have perished there.

Bandung zoo said the cause of Yani's death was yet to be determined but the creature appeared lethargic before she died and pictures showed large sores on her body.

Efforts to save the elephant were hampered as the zoo had been without a resident veterinarian for almost a year, zoo spokesman Sudaryo admitted.

But the spokesman, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, insisted the zoo had done all it could by consulting an outside vet and elephant-keeper and providing medicines.

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Friday, February 17, 2017

Baby elephant rescued near Indonesian palm oil plantation

Banda Aceh - A baby elephant found terrified and malnourished near a palm oil plantation is being nursed back to health at a conservation centre on Indonesia's Sumatra island.

Last week, animal experts in Aceh province received a tip-off about a dead elephant without its tusks.

When the team arrived they found the dead animal, along with the abandoned 11-month-old calf.

"We suspect the adult elephant was shot. He was probably with a group, so the others fled but the baby got left behind," Aceh conservation centre head Sapto Aji Prabowo told AFP.

"The baby was malnourished, so that's why we took him to the elephant conservation centre."

The youngster weighs around 300 kilogrammes just over half the typical weight of an animal of his age.

Rangers transported the hungry creature to the conservation centre where it is being looked after by specialists.

"It was in a bad condition, depressed, limp. It was obvious from his gestures that he was afraid of us. Now it's getting better," said veterinarian Rosa Rika Wahyuni.

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Saturday, January 28, 2017

Elephant tusks believed from Sabah

KOTA KINABALU: The Sabah Wildlife Department (SWD) has contacted the Indonesian CITES Management Authority about the elephants tusks that were taken from a woman in Nunukan, North Kalimantan a week ago.

The five pieces of tusks were believed to be from Sabah, a news portal reported.

SWD director Augustine Tuuga when commenting on the report said that the department did not know exactly where the tusks came from.

It can only be ascertained when statement from the person who carried them was taken by Indonesian wildlife authorities or DNA analysis can be done and compared to the specimens of the animals killed in Sabah, he said.

“We just pray that the Indonesian wildlife authorities will conduct a thorough investigation into the case.We already contacted the Indonesian CITES Management Authority regarding the matter through the assistance of Traffic Southeast Asia. We just wait for the outcome of their investigation. They may contact us if they need our assistance,” he added.

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Sunday, January 15, 2017

Indonesia: Four Sumatran elephants died in Riau in 2016 -- WWF

Pekanbaru (ANTARA News) - The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) has said that four Sumatran elephants died in 2016 in Riau Province, a decline from the previous year.

"In 2015, there were 10 cases of dead elephants, while in 2016, the number decreased to four," Spokesperson of WWF of the Riau Program Syamsidar said here on Tuesday.

The four deaths are believed to have occurred due to conflict between humans and wild animals.

Last year, the Tesso Nilo National Park Authority found the carcass of a Sumatran elephant in Pelalawan District.

They also found a Sumatran elephant snared in an industrial forest concession. The animal did not survive despite treatment.

In September last year, an elephant calf was found trapped in a ditch in an industrial forest concession with wounds all over its body.

"An elephant also died after being electrocuted in Duri region, near a residential area," Syamsidar said.

No suspects were either identified or arrested in these cases, Syamsidar said.

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Friday, December 16, 2016

Indonesia: Elephants suffering from malnutrition sent to sanctuary

After spending over 10 years at the Aras Napal elephant-training center, three elephants suffering from malnutrition were sent to the Barumun Nagari wildlife sanctuary in North Padang Lawas regency, North Sumatra, on Friday in an effort to save their lives.

The transfer of Dion, Aini and Tanti — as the elephants are called — by North Sumatra Natural Resource Conservation Agency (BKSDA) took 23 hours.

The transfer of the one male and two female elephants ran smoothly, Dede Tanjung of the North Sumatra BKSDA responsible for the transfer said. “While in the sanctuary we will improve their nutrition. We will give them additional food, such as pineapples, watermelons and sugarcane,” Dede said.

The agency’s planning, protection and conservation section head Rahmad Saleh Simbolon said the transfer was conducted to save the elephants from starvation.

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Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Captive elephants help save wild cousins on forest frontline

Lampung, Indonesia, Dec 7, 2016 (AFP) - It was the middle of the night when the villagers sounded the alarm: a huge Sumatran elephant was raiding their rice fields, and they needed urgent help to drive it back to the forest.
Dodot -- a veteran Indonesian elephant keeper trained to handle such emergencies -- rushed to the scene, fearing villagers would take matters into their own hands if he didn’t get there in time.

”It was the king,” Dodot said of the hungry bull male that had strayed from the forest in southeast Sumatra in search of food.

”He’s not afraid of humans, or weapons. He owns the territory.”

It was the third such intrusion in a month.

Confrontations between elephants and humans can quickly turn violent in Sumatra, where competition for space has intensified as the island’s forests have been rapidly cleared for timber and farming.

Nearly 70 percent of the Sumatran elephants habitat has been destroyed in a single generation, says conservation group WWF, driving them into ever-closer contact with humans.

Villagers have been trampled and killed by stampeding herds, but it’s the elephants that have suffered most as their habitats have shrunk.


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Saturday, December 03, 2016

Elephant that killed Indonesian man shot dead

TAWAU, Nov 21 — The wild elephant that killed an Indonesian plantation worker at the Dumpas oil palm plantation near here was shot dead by Sabah Wildlife Department’s rangers yesterday evening.

Its Director, Augustine Tuuga said the elephant had already killed a human and the chances that it would attack again if it came across anyone in its path was high.

“We did not want to take any chances with this bull.

“We have confirmed that the bull elephant was on musth, musth is a periodic state of heightened sexual activity and aggression in adult male elephants caused by a marked increase of the hormone testosterone in the body, resulting in the very violent behaviour of this bull elephant” he said in a statement here, today.

He said, the officers in the east coast region would also be on high alert to monitor the movement of the elephant herds within these bull elephant ranges.

On 19 Nov, Ciin Bedu, 48, an oil palm plantation worker was attacked at around 3pm and trampled to death by a wild elephant in Dumpas plantation area near here.  — Bernama

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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Indonesian worker trampled to death by wild elephant

TAWAU: An Indonesian man was trampled to death by an elephant in Dumpas timber plantation area near here, earlier today.

District police chief Assistant Commissioner Fadil Marsus who confirmed the incident said the victim, a 48-year employee at the plantation died of head injuries after being trampled by a wild elephant.

“A distress call was received around 3.22pm to inform us that there was a victim who had died after an elephant attacked him at the Dumpas timber plantations near the border of Bombalai towards Kalabakan,” he told Bernama.

According to him, the victim was taken to the Tawau Hospital. This is the second incident of an elephant attacking civilians this month.

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Indonesia: Young elephants free themselves from trap

Rescue work: Volunteers medically treat two Sumatran elephants whose legs were injured by a steel trap in Pancasila hamlet, Sei Lepan district, Langkat North Sumatra, on Monday. The elephants freed themselves after four days of being snared by the mechanism.(JP/Apriadi Gunawan)

After being trapped in a steel snare for four days, two wild Sumatran elephants in the Mount Leuser National Park (TNGL) managed to free themselves from the trap, although their legs were severely injured and infected.

The mammals were trapped in a community-owned oil palm plantation in Sei Lepan district, Langkat regency, North Sumatra.

Garendel Siboro, head of technical affairs at the North Sumatra Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA), said both of the elephants were females.

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Thursday, November 24, 2016

Indonesian worker trampled to death by wild elephant

An Indonesian man was trampled to death by an elephant in Dumpas timber plantation area near here, earlier today.

District police chief Assistant Commissioner Fadil Marsus who confirmed the incident said the victim, a 48-year employee at the plantation died of head injuries after being trampled by a wild elephant.

“A distress call was received around 3.22pm to inform us that there was a victim who had died after an elephant attacked him at the Dumpas timber plantations near the border of Bombalai towards Kalabakan,” he told Bernama.

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Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Wild Aceh elephants guided back to forest

Human’s friends: Three domesticated elephants are taken on a patrol near oil palm plantations to drive away a parade of wild elephants in East Aceh on Monday. The wild elephants sometimes attack villages in the area.(JP/Hotli Simanjuntak)

Three trained elephants named Bunta, Lilik and Midok are being used to drive away their wild cousins that have been rummaging through farms and homes in Seumanah Jaya village, East Aceh regency, Aceh.

The regency administration deployed the three bull elephants from the East Aceh Serbajadi Conservation Response Unit (CRU) and others from the Saree Elephant Training Center (PLG) on Monday after receiving a report that a herd of wild elephants had often been trespassing into human settlements in the area.

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Thursday, January 10, 2013

Endangered Sumatran elephant found dead in western Indonesia; 17th death in 9 months



JAKARTA, Indonesia - Indonesian police say an endangered Sumatran elephant has been found dead at a rubber plantation, apparently poisoned by poachers.

It is the 17th Sumatran elephant found dead on the island of Sumatra since March.

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Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Google Mapping Tool Exposes Illegal Logging

Conservationists working to save forests and species on the ground are looking to the sky, thanks to mapping tools and satellites that capture Earth like never before.

One project, Eyes on the Forest, is lifting the veil on forest loss in Sumatra, Indonesia, where demand for pulp, palm oil, rubber, and coal has created a nearly ”unstoppable wave of [illegal] deforestation,” said Michael Stuewe, a WWF-US scientist I met for breakfast this morning at the World Conservation Congress.

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